Welcome to the Lonergan Australia website.

Bernard Lonergan was a philosopher, theologian, economist and methodologist in the 20th Century. He confronted philosophers with three basic questions:

  • What am I doing when I am knowing?
  • Why is doing that knowing?
  • What do I know when I do it?

He asked fundamental questions about human living, about how we make progress in our own human development, about how we progress in our living together.

We hope you find the resources on this website valuable.

Quote of the day

To conceive God as originating value and the world as terminal value implies that God too is self-transcending and that the world is the fruit of his self-transcendence, the expression and manifestation of his benevolence
and beneficence, his glory…

Faith places human efforts in a friendly universe…

(Bernard Lonergan, Method in Theology, p.113)

Latest news

3 March 2024

In Memory of Anthony (Tony) Kelly, CSSR

(11 May 1938 – 3 March 2024)

Members of the Lonergan Australia community were saddened to hear of the the death of Tony Kelly. Tony was one of Australia’s leading Catholic theologians. In the 1960s, he studied under Bernard Lonergan in Rome and Boston. Through his courses on Method in Theology he introduced many students to the writings of Bernard Lonergan.  He wrote around twenty books and numerous articles, many of which were strongly influenced by Bernard Lonergan. (His key Lonergan publications are listed here.)

Anthony Kelly 3

… when science, and the human experience out of which it grows, wakens to its current holistic proportions, the need for a new paradigm is more difficult to either express or explain. The disconcerting element in the new holism is the presence of the human self of the explorer. The journey ‘outward’ into reality needs a more firm connection to a journey ‘inward’, into those mysterious dimensions of human consciousness. This manifold awareness is capable of endless differentiation, as in the objectivity of the scientist, the creativity of the artist, the unutterable experience of the mystic, and in the everyday communication and action that make up the ordinary human world…

[The new paradigm] aims to cultivate a consciousness that brings together all the differentiations of consciousness into the human conversation, and to reveal their roots in each individual self.

… [Bernard Lonergan’s] method, understood as ‘a framework of collaborative creativity’… is founded in the phenomenon of consciousness, and on the dynamics, differentiations and conversions it manifests. Such a method is inherently open and flexible, and proportionately applicable to all fields of learning…

…the scope of the challenge [is] to connect the scientific data on the genesis of the cosmos with both the psychological data of the genesis of the self, and the religious data on the genesis of God within the world through the mystery of the Incarnation. However, such making connections is not merely a matter of having a more comprehensive ‘look’ at reality. It is rather the outcome of a method that interconnects various methods of investigation in the dynamics of consciousness. Such dynamics are brought to mind in the imperatives Lonergan objectifies, as ‘Be attentive!’ (empirical consciousness); ‘Be intelligent!’ (intellectual consciousness); ‘Be reasonable!’ (rational consciousness); ‘Be responsible!’ (moral and affective consciousness)… (from An Expanding Theology: Faith in a World of Connections)

9 September 2023

2023 Australian Lonergan Workshop – Presentations
An Organon for Our Time: connecting theory and practice

The inspiration for the theme of the workshop is Fred Crowe’s Method in Theology: An Organon for Our Time

The Tom Daly Oration was presented by John Boyd Turner.

The keynote speaker was Dr Jonathan Heaps, Lonergan Fellow, The Lonergan Institute at Boston College.

Click here for the video and audio of presentations.

Commemorating 50 Years of Method in Theology.

 

14 November 2022

Commemorating 50 years of Method in Theology

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of Method in Theology, a group of seven agreed to participate in a dialectic analysis exercise of a key chapter of Method, Chapter 5, ‘Functional Specialties’. Dialectic analysis involves three objectifications (see Method p.234-35). In the first objectification, each participant did his best to identify his horizon for making sense of Chapter 5. In the second objectification, each participant conjectured, as concretely as possible, whether functional collaboration entails, or will entail, a relatively minor, moderate, or major shift in theological practice, practice in another discipline, and/or practice in all areas. In the final objectification, the participants read the essays of other participants and sought to identify what merits further development and what needs to be reversed. Each contribution was limited by word count, time constraints and other commitments.

The results of this exercise have now been published in The Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis (Volume 16).

Editor’s Introduction – James Duffy

Assembling Functional Specialties – Bruce Anderson

Dialectic Exercise on Method in Theology, Chapter 5 – Ivo Coelho

Functional Collaboration: A Novel Challenge – James Duffy

Effective Dialectical Analysis: Chapter 5, Method in Theology – Sean McNelis

My Own Modest Exercise in Dialectic – Cyril Orji

Method in Theology, chapter 5, “Functional Specialties” – Terrance Quinn

Functional Specialization and the Future of the Love of Wisdom – Paul St. Amour

 

29 August 2022

50 Years of Method in Theology: Doing Theology in the Twenty-First Century
Second Lecture series

The Lonergan Institute has organised a lecture series to commemorate the publication of Method in Theology in 1972. In this publication, Bernard Lonergan proposed eight functional specialties as a way integrating the disparate methods in theology. While the context is method in the theology, functional collaboration is the key to progress in any area of human endeavour.

For details and to obtain a Zoom link, see the Lonergan Institute, Boston website.

The Melbourne/Sydney days/times for the second series of lectures are:

Nikolaus Wandinger (University of Innsbruck),
“Religious Conversion as an Ongoing Process’”
8.00am, Tuesday 13th September
Gordon Rixon, SJ (Regis College),
“Contentions in Meaning: Lonergan and Decolonizing the Common Good”
7.00am, Friday 14th October

Jeremy Wilkins, (Boston College)
“Theology at Twilight: In-commensurabilities of Religious Meaning”

7.00am, Friday 4th November

15 February 2022

50 Years of Method in Theology: Doing Theology in the Twenty-First Century
First Lecture series

The Melbourne/Sydney days/times for the first series of lectures are:

M. Shawn Copeland, “Lonergan and the ‘Decolonial Turn’”8.30am, Tuesday 22nd February
Frederick G. Lawrence, “Theology as Hermeneutical: The Road to the Hermeneutics of Love”7.30am, Friday 18th March
Mark D. Morelli, “Hegel Inside Out: Lonergan’s Debt to Hegel”
(Panel with Thomas McPartland, Andrew Barrette, Elisa Magri and Matthew Peters)
7.30am, Friday 1st April
Neil J. Ormerod, “Method, Meaning and Doctrinal Development”5.00am, Saturday 9th April

Note: the change in time is due to the commencement of summer time in Boston and the ending of summer time in Australia.

2 October 2021

Reorienting Education and the Social Sciences: Transitioning Towards the Positive Anthropocene, by Robert Henman (2019)
This book presents human curiosity as a foundation and central dynamic for education and the social sciences. In doing so, it also provides a beginning for a new method in the sciences, which as an extension of emergent probability (evolution), reaches for, and provides the structure and process for an intervention in history. This intervention is designed to offset what is a negative Anthropocenic epoch in human history. The present problems associated with research in the social sciences and its application to children and humanity regards us all as test subjects. If we are to overcome this failure of the social sciences and education, there is the need to discover “what” we are, what in this book is referred to as self-identification. It is designed to assist the education and social science researcher in initiating his or her own self-identification regarding the dynamics of the data of consciousness and their implications for scientific and global progress. This work draws mainly on the thought and writings of Bernard Lonergan and Philip McShane. Lonergan, through his intentionality analysis, and discovery of Functional Specialization, has resolved many of the problems that traditional philosophy and scientific research have been plagued with since the Renaissance. McShane has expanded Lonergan’s thought by developing structures to aid in reforming education and scientific procedure. This book is an attempt to apply both Lonergan’s and McShane’s developments in a readable manner for the current scientific researcher.
This book is available from Amazon Australia ($16.83). Look inside the book at Amazon Canada.

4 July 2021

An Introduction to Bernard Lonergan: Exploring Lonergan’s approach to the great philosophical questions, by Peter Beer, SJ

Peter Beer has recently published a second edition of his book on Bernard Lonergan. This book is suitable for all readers but particularly for senior students or university students. It aims to help form a basis for inquiry into Lonergan’s achievement in his new approach to the great philosophical questions: what do I do when I know something? (cognitional theory), why is doing that ‘knowing’? (epistemology) and what do I know when I do that? (metaphysics).

Lonergan deals with these questions somewhat more deeply in his major works, Insight (1957[1992]) and Method in Theology (1972 [2017]). Here he invites one to discover in oneself the dynamic structure of one’s own cognitional and moral being and in doing this, one finds an operative procedure that is not open to radical revision. In fact, Lonergan has unearthed a dynamic, conscious framework for creativity, a method that grounds all investigation that is intelligent and critical. It is a resource that is transcendental in that it is the concrete and dynamic unfolding of human attentiveness, intelligence, reasonableness and responsibility, and this unfolding occurs whenever one uses one’s mind in an appropriate fashion.

This method, for investigators too, is new in its finding eight tasks that are distinct and separable stages in the single process from data to results and can be adapted to any subject in which investigations are responding to past history and are to influence future history.

The book is available from Amazon Australia, Amazon USA and Amazon Canada.

Reviews

10 February 2021

In Memory of Robert M (Bob) Doran, S.J. (20 June 1939 – 21 January 2021)

Fr Robert M. Doran SJ, who devoted his life to promoting and building on the legacy of Bernard Lonergan, died on 21 January 2021.

Bob was born in New York in 1939. After graduating from Marquette University High School in Milwaukee in 1956, he joined the Wisconsin Province of the Society of Jesus.  He was ordained a priest in 1969 and went on to do a doctorate in theology at Marquette University. From 1979-2006 he taught at Regis College in Toronto, before returning to Marquette University where he was professor of systematic theology until his death.

During his life, Bob built up a community of scholarship which includes students, scholars and friends across the globe. He was a teacher and mentor to many, a number of Australian theologians among them, including Neil Ormerod, Christian Jacobs-Vandegeer, Rohan Curnow, Daniel Monsour, Anne Hunt, Robin Koning, Kathleen Williams and John Collins.

Among his many contributions, Bob was:

  • general editor of The Collected Works of Bernard Lonergan (a set of twenty-five volumes published between 1990 and 2019)
  • co-founder and director emeritus of the Lonergan Research Institute, Toronto
  • the co-ordinator of the International Institute for Method in Theology (a network of groups of academics who agree to employ Lonergan’s method in addressing diverse themes in philosophy, theology, and the social sciences)
  • a trustee of the Bernard Lonergan Literary Estate and of the Frederik Crowe Literary Estate
  • the co-founder of the Lonergan Archive, Lonergan Resource and Lonergan Forum websites
  • a teacher of systematic theology at Regis College (Toronto) and Marquette University (Wisconsin), and
  • author of some ground-breaking books: Theology and the Dialectics of History (1990); Theological Foundations (2 volumes) (1995); What Is Systematic Theology? (2005); The Trinity in History: A Theology of the Divine Missions (3 volumes) (2012, 2019, 2021).

In reminiscing on Bob’s life, Robin Koning recalls:

When I went to Regis College in Toronto to begin my doctoral studies, I soon came across Bob Doran and his towering intellect. His courses considerably deepened my understanding of Lonergan’s work, drawing as they did on the two strands of Bob’s contribution to the Lonergan enterprise. Firstly, there was his incomparable knowledge of Lonergan’s own works, grounded in his detailed study both of Lonergan’s larger works and already published material and also of the archival material which he helped assemble systematically and later made available to a wider audience on the Lonergan Archives site. Secondly, there was Bob’s own significant development of Lonergan’s work in three major ways. To Lonergan’s triad of intellectual, moral and religious conversion, he added psychic conversion, drawing on his engagement with depth psychology. This work, together with his engagement with Marxism and other social theories, underpinned his development of Lonergan’s notions of the integral scale of values and of dialectic, resulting in his Theology and the Dialectics of History. Finally, he found in Lonergan’s work on the Trinity an intriguing paragraph which he came to refer to as the “four-point hypothesis” because it relates four created supernatural realities to the four divine relations within the Trinity. From this starting point, Bob began to develop his own systematic theology, as well as inviting others to contribute, on the basis of this hypothesis, to an ongoing genetic sequence of systematic theologies which he recognized could only be the work of a community of scholars. In his teaching, Bob held together great precision of expression, an encyclopaedic knowledge of Lonergan’s work, and a capacity not simply to parrot that work but to expound and teach it in ways which helped students to have the necessary insights, thus manifesting, as Lonergan himself would say, the depth of his engagement and understanding of the material. He was also ever attentive to and patient with the questions his students would ask.

As my coursework ended, I asked Bob to be my doctoral supervisor to which he agreed with his customary generosity. He was not a pushy director but was always available, despite the demands of his own original scholarship, his role as Director of the Lonergan Research Institute, his work on the archives, and his editing of the Collected Works of Bernard Lonergan, not to mention his pastoral work, especially with those with HIV/AIDS. Within all this, he would make time to review drafts of chapters and to help clarify questions, always focusing on the big picture, asking the relevant questions about what was essential to the project, and ever encouraging of this journeyman academic who was not gifted with his creativity and vision.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When I went to Regis College in Toronto to begin my doctoral studies, I soon came across Bob Doran and his towering intellect. His courses considerably deepened my understanding of Lonergan’s work, drawing as they did on the two strands of Bob’s contribution to the Lonergan enterprise. Firstly, there was his incomparable knowledge of Lonergan’s own works, grounded in his detailed study both of Lonergan’s larger works and already published material and also of the archival material which he helped assemble systematically and later made available to a wider audience on the Lonergan Archives site. Secondly, there was Bob’s own significant development of Lonergan’s work in three major ways. To Lonergan’s triad of intellectual, moral and religious conversion, he added psychic conversion, drawing on his engagement with depth psychology. This work, together with his engagement with Marxism and other social theories, underpinned his development of Lonergan’s notions of the integral scale of values and of dialectic, resulting in his Theology and the Dialectics of History. Finally, he found in Lonergan’s work on the Trinity an intriguing paragraph which he came to refer to as the “four-point hypothesis” because it relates four created supernatural realities to the four divine relations within the Trinity. From this starting point, Bob began to develop his own systematic theology, as well as inviting others to contribute, on the basis of this hypothesis, to an ongoing genetic sequence of systematic theologies which he recognized could only be the work of a community of scholars. In his teaching, Bob held together great precision of expression, an encyclopaedic knowledge of Lonergan’s work, and a capacity not simply to parrot that work but to expound and teach it in ways which helped students to have the necessary insights, thus manifesting, as Lonergan himself would say, the depth of his engagement and understanding of the material. He was also ever attentive to and patient with the questions his students would ask.

As my coursework ended, I asked Bob to be my doctoral supervisor to which he agreed with his customary generosity. He was not a pushy director but was always available, despite the demands of his own original scholarship, his role as Director of the Lonergan Research Institute, his work on the archives, and his editing of the Collected Works of Bernard Lonergan, not to mention his pastoral work, especially with those with HIV/AIDS. Within all this, he would make time to review drafts of chapters and to help clarify questions, always focusing on the big picture, asking the relevant questions about what was essential to the project, and ever encouraging of this journeyman academic who was not gifted with his creativity and vision.

 

 

22 December 2020

Clement Papa has just completed his PhD thesis Towards a Theology of Redeeming History: Tracing the Origins and the Development of Bernard Lonergan’s Theology of Redemptive History as Found in his Unpublished Papers of File 713.

Through a thorough study of the early unpublished essays and notes on Bernard Lonergan’s dialectic of history, this thesis concludes that Lonergan’s early insights remain and mature in his later works. In particular, the work establishes the importance of applying Lonergan’s praxis theology, concluding that an understanding of Lonergan’s theology of redemptive history will help towards finding solutions to Melanesia’s contemporary social challenges.

 

 

11 December 2020

In Memory of Cornelius Patrick (Conn) O’Donovan (17 March 1930 – 11 November 2020)

Our colleague and friend, Conn O’Donovan, was a regular attendee, participant and presenter at our biennial Australian Lonergan Workshop. He had a particular expertise and interest in the philosophy of learning.

He will remembered as a passionate and compassionate man, a lover of his wife Paddy, a scholar and a teacher,. He will also be remembered for this love of music and Lindt 85% dark chocolate.

His funeral service can be viewed (until 20th May 2021) at: https://www.FuneralVideo.com.au/CorneliusODonovan\. A hard copy of the eulogy by Shane Hogan, former headmaster at St.Ignatius College, Riverview is available to download here. This includes a little of life-story.

In Lonergan circles, he will be remembered an educator, a reformer of philosophy and theology courses and a translator and interpreter of one of Lonergan’s important contributions to theology.

Educator

Throughout his life, Conn was an educator at various institutions – Belvedere College, Dublin; St.Louis University, Missouri; and Milltown Institute of Theology and Philosophy.

Over the past 40 years, Conn taught at St.Aloysius College, Milson’s Point and St.Ignatius College, Riverview (in Sydney, Australia). He is particularly noted for his course on “Wonder about Wonder: an introduction to philosophy” which aimed to have students grasp their own native wonder.

Reformer In the early 1960s, Conn worked closely with Phil McShane and others in reforming philosophy and theology courses at the Jesuit Milltown Institute, Dublin. In a 2003 article in the Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis reflecting on the first forty years of Phil McShane, Conn recalled the challenge and the difficulties they faced:
There was considerable discontent, and even cynicism, among those Jesuit students, whether Lonergan inspired or not, who looked on theology as something more than just a canonical prerequisite for ordination, or who had already achieved considerable success in some other field. Many of them simply went along with the system, mastering the matter presented and producing it, on request, at examination time; others registered a kind of protest by pursuing private interests as much as possible; those inspired by Lonergan tended increasingly to raise questions in class in a manner that challenged their professors’ authority, at times, unfortunately, with a crude appeal to the authority of Lonergan. We did not know then that we were living through the final years of a system that Lonergan later described as hopelessly antiquated but not yet demolished, that what was happening at Milltown was happening all over the world, and that the upheaval that was soon to come would affect much more than the traditional seminary courses in philosophy and theology.
Translator and interpreter In the early 1970s, Conn undertook the long and arduous task of translating, from Latin into English, the first part of the first volume of Bernard Lonergan’s De Deo Trino. It was published in 1976 by Darton Longman & Todd as The Way to Nicea: The Dialectical Development of Trinitarian Theology and examined the dialectical process by which the dogma of the Trinity developed in the first four centuries. The Way to Nicea was the first translation of Lonergan’s Latin writings to be published.
Lonergan was always reluctant to have any of his Latin texts translated because he wrote them in Latin for a very specific audience, I.e., the students from 17 nations at the Gregorian, as well the Holy Office who had to approve all texts used at pontifical universities.  He said that he would have written it “differently” in English or French.
Having read Conn’s translation of the first part of de Deo Trino he thought it excellent and agreed to have it published as The Way to Nicea.The book includes an important introduction by Conn in which he sets out to:
  • survey the content and indicate the structure of the whole two-volume work [De Deo Trino] of which the part translated constitutes one sixth,
  • Give an account of Lonergan’s academic courses on the Trinity, from 1945 to 1964, with some references to other work in progress at the time of these courses,
  • Give a brief history of Lonergan’s writings on the Trinity during his years in Rome culminating in the 1964 De Deo Trino,
  • Discuss the importance for Lonergan of trinitarian theology as the area in which (mainly) he worked out his method in theology
  • Comment on Lonergan’s enduring involvement with and contribution to trinitarian theology as a topic of the greatest importance within theology
  • Suggest some reasons why Lonergan has been so far unwilling to release for publication in translation any more than this one part of De Deo Trino and why he has released even as much as he has
  • Make a few comments on the tasks of translation itself.
[Translator’s Introduction p.ix-x]
Philip McShane with Bernard Lonergan in 1971

11 July 2020

Philip McShane (1932-2020)

Philip McShane, one of the leading interpreters of Bernard Lonergan’s writings, died last week (1 July). He devoted his life to teaching, exploring and extending the insights of Bernard Lonergan. “It is worth a life.”

Phil was an authority not only on Lonergan’s Insight: A Study of Human Understanding but also on his economic, philosophic and theological writings. He vigorously promoted Lonergan’s method of functional collaboration as the key to sustained global progress, as relevant to all areas of human endeavour, indeed to the future of humanity. He also vigorously promoted Lonergan’s economics – edited Lonergan’s early writings on economics (For a New Political Economy, Volume 21 of the Collected Works of Bernard Lonergan) and, authored a primer (Economics for Everyone: Das Jus Kapital) and other books on this economics.

Among his students, he was loved and respected for his joie de vivre, his friendship, humour and creativity and, for inviting them into unexplored depths of human living. While his writings, full of references and allusions to literature and historical figures, were difficult reading, they invited readers to take the next steps in their development and think through issues themselves. Phil was forever seeking new understandings of Bernard Lonergan’s writings and ways of communicating this among many different groups of people. Among his peers, he was a respected and challenging figure as he was always pushing forward in his thinking and writing… and nonplussed as to why others weren’t.

In 2007, at the invitation of Conn O’Donovan, Phil came to Australia. As scholar-in-residence at Saint Ignatius’ College Riverview for 5 weeks, he gave a series of classes and seminars on Ignatian pedagogy and spirituality and, on Lonergan’s breakthrough to a science of economics. He generously accepted an invitation to present the keynote address, Insight into the Future, to the Australian Lonergan Workshop. He also presented a seminar on “Reforming education: applying Bernard Lonergan’s theory of education”.

Phil returned again later in 2007 for the 50 Years of Insight: Lonergan’s Contribution to Philosophy and Theology Conference which celebrated the 50th anniversary of the publication of Bernard Lonergan’s Insight: A Study of Human Understanding. At this conference he presented “Insight within a Global Culture” as well as a long list of Lonergan’s achievements.

Truly, he will be missed by his many friends and those searching to understand and change their world.

Philip McShane’s writings and a longer biography are available on his website, along with tributes and the video below.

Philip McShane with Bernard Lonergan in 1971
Philip McShane with Sally McShane and Conn O'Donovan in Australia 2007
Philip McShane with Sally McShane and Tom Halloran in Australia 2007

25 June 2020

Australian Lonergan Workshop III

Matthew Ogilvie (editor) has recently published Australian Lonergan Workshop III (The Lonergan Centre, Sydney 2019).

This collection of papers includes works on science, philosophy, education, leadership, theology, psychology and spirituality:

  • Help from Lonergan on Natural Evil – Stephen Ames
  • Lonergan’s Theology of the Holy Spirit – Peter Beer, SJ
  • Trent’s Temporal Punishment and Today’s Renewal of Penance – Peter Beer, SJ
  • What Price Indulgences? Trent and Today – Peter Beer, SJ
  • Lonergan, Group Relations and Formation for Educational Leadership in Catholic Schools – John Francis Collins
  • The Quest for Rest: a Lonerganian Contribution to a Balthasarian Question – Meredith Secomb
  • The Rejected Subject: Two Examples – Matthew Ogilvie
  • “The Truth Will Set You Free” – Papers from the Thomas V.Daly SJ Oration of 2017
      • Part I: Challenges to Truth Today – Matthew Ogilvie
      • Part II: What is the Truth that Sets us Free? – Matthew Ogilvie

Australian Lonergan Workshop III is available from Amazon.com.au (Australia), Amazon.com (US),  and the Book Depository (worldwide).

25 June 2020

Conversion as Transformation: Lonergan, Mentors and Cinema

Dominic Arcamone has published Conversion as Transformation: Lonergan, Mentors and Cinema (Pickwick Publications, 2020)

The process of human transformation is complex and ongoing. This book presents a framework for understanding human transformation through the insights of Bernard Lonergan. The reader will be introduced to terms such as the turn to the subject, consciousness, subjectivity, and intersubjectivity. It will explore terms such as horizon, feelings, values, self-esteem, sublation, conversion, dialectic, and religious experience. The book explores transformation through the way mentors have authored their own lives, told their own stories, and taken possession of their interiority. Transformation is illustrated through the lives of saints and ordinary men and women who did extraordinary things, such as St. Augustine, Dag Hammarskjold, Vaclav Havel, Franz Jaggerstatter, St. Therese of Lisieux, Fredrich Nietzsche, Katherine Ann Power, and Marie Cardinal. Transformation is also illustrated through the medium of cinema: Babette’s Feast, The Mission, As It is in Heaven, Romero, Dead Poets Society, Ordinary People, The Godfather trilogy, Three Color trilogy, The Lord of the Rings trilogy, Dial M for Murder, and Twelve Angry Men. While the book treats religious, moral, affective, intellectual, and psychic conversion as moments of transformation, it argues that ecological conversion requires all of these so as to meet the most serious moral challenge of our time.

A preview (including Contents) of the book is available at Pickwick Publications.

28 May 2020

Educating for Civic Dialogue in an Age of Uncivil Discourse

Dennis Gunn has recently published Educating for Civic Dialogue in an Age of Uncivil Discourse (Routledge, 2020)

Educating for Civic Dialogue in an Age of Uncivil Discourse addresses an urgent challenge—to help students learn the skills of civic engagement—by offering a framework for authentic cosmopolitan education. As an invitation to ongoing civil dialogue with diverse voices in the classroom, the book aims to foster the skills of democratic and global citizenship that allow students to find their voice as local, national, and global citizens outside of the classroom. It suggests practical ways that teachers can promote the skills of attentive listening, intelligent questioning, reasonable positioning, and responsible dialogue in order to encourage authentic civic discourse. It also outlines specific pedagogical strategies designed to foster students’ cosmopolitan competencies as democratic and global citizens.

The book is based on his doctoral dissertation on Lonergan’s philosophy of education at Fordham University as well as subsequent research into his notion of cosmopolis.

More information is available from Amazon Australia and Routledge.

Dennis Gunn is Assistant Professor in the Education Department at Iona College, New Rochelle, NY

11 April 2020

Economics Actually: Today and Tomorrow. Sustainable and Inclusive

Terrance Quinn and John Benton have recently published Economics Actually: Today and Tomorrow. Sustainable and Inclusive (Island House Press, Toronto, December 2019)

Accessible to a wide audience, Economics Actually introduces a structure for economic science that has not yet been picked up by professional economists. It begins with facts and data to reveal key functions and relations by which to understand any economy and any economic event. The structure is operative in firms of all sizes, from the smallest roadside business to global corporations and world stock markets. It is the much-needed basis from which to address today’s unprecedented social, economic and ecological crises.

For preview and video see Island House Press. Purchase in Australia from Amazon.

10 April 2020

The Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis

Volume 12 (2020) of The Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis has just been released. This issue on Dialectic and Genetic Method is dedicated to Michael Shute. This volume features a tribute to Michael Shute and articles by David Oyler, John Raymaker, Bill Zanardi, Frank Briao, James Duffy and Hugh Williams.

10 April 2020

Mike Shute – Video: For What Problem is Functional Collaboration the Solution?

Mike Shute was a great Lonergan scholar, promoting a better understanding of Lonergan’s legacy. At the 2013 Australian Lonergan Workshop he recorded a video  for us “For What Problem is Functional Collaboration the Solution?“.

9 April 2020

Philip McShane – Interpretation from A to Z // The Future: Core Precepts in Supramolecular Method and Nanochemistry

Philip McShane has recently published two books, Interpretation from A to Z (Axial Publishing, March 21, 202) and  The Future: Core Precepts in Supramolecular Method and Nanochemistry (Axial Publishing, October 2019).

Interpretation from A to Z: McShane’s broad interest is in finding a full effective cultural basis of a future humanity. In *The Future: Core Precepts in Supramolecular Method and Nanochemistry* (2019), he expressed what he considers the effective road forward. The present book enlarges on that reach. The effective road involves a clear operative distinction between the negative Anthropocene, in which we presently live shabbily and destructively, and the positive Anthropocene towards which we must work slowly and democratically, against empires of idiocy, by tuning into the chemistry of our desires. This little book moves along with many twists and turns, but it is also a straightforward help to begin to read properly the two main treatments by Lonergan of the topic of Interpretation: Section 3 of chapter 17 of *Insight*, and chapter 7 of *Method in Theology*. (More information is available from Amazon Canada or USA.)

The Future: Core Precepts in Supramolecular Method and Nanochemistry foments a chemical revolution that lifts us towards the positive Anthropocene, leaving behind the sick killing and dying days of the negative Anthropocene so neatly identified in 1940 by Charlie Chaplin at the conclusion of The Great Dictator: “Greed has poisoned men’s souls, has barricaded the world with hate, has goose-stepped us into misery and bloodshed. We have developed speed, but we have shut ourselves in. Machinery that gives abundance has left us in want.” Instead of The Great Dictator we now have, globally, a way of no-life hiding in the full spectrum of left and right governments. The chemistry of the sick superego of an industrious surge of humanity over millennia is the hidden persuader of our drive to self-destruction. Yes, the symbol is CO2, but the reality is the brain-chemistry that enslaves us all. Yes, the revolution is to save the earth and the air we breathe, but the saving must be done by a catalytic lift of the chemistry of our minding of ourselves in nature. This little red book points us towards a leap beyond Marx, Mao, and Mantras of democracy to a new sanity of human abundance. (More information is available from Amazon Australia.)

9 April 2020

Terrance Quinn – The (Pre-)Dawning of Functional Specialization in Physics // Invitation to Generalized Empirical Method: In Philosophy and Science

Terrance Quinn has published The (Pre-)Dawning of Functional Specialization in Physics (World Scientific Publishing, Singapore 2017 ) and Invitation to Generalized Empirical Method: In Philosophy and Science (World Scientific Publishing, Singapore 2017)

The (Pre-)Dawning of Functional Specialization in Physics invites attention to data for each of the eight main tasks evident and self-evident in existing scholarship in modern physics. It makes preliminary efforts toward envisioning something of what functional collaboration will look like — in physics, the Academy and Society. For further information see World Scientific Publishing.

Invitation to Generalized Empirical Method: In Philosophy and Science: Bernard Lonergan identified the need and possibility of what he called “generalized empirical method” in science and philosophy. Implementation will be a future community achievement. This book enters into details of a selection of examples in the sciences and philosophy of science. For further information see World Scientific Publishing.

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